I Tell You Mine, You Tell Me Yours

My weekend was busy, but amazing! I started my day going to a soccer game; we won. Then I stopped by to see MtnMan and he surprised me with lunch, which is always nice; I had tater tots. From there I went to the grocery store; the young man knew how to bag groceries, so no complaints there. I made it home and got started on the dresser project, but only had 2.5 hours to devote because I wanted to go fishing; we caught two bass. Priorities. Sunday I was on cam, earlier than usual so we skipped the diner.

So, about this dresser project. I have been applying paint to the cabinet for a few days now. After watching a video from a paint manufacturer on how to properly paint furniture, I have decided to take my time and basically dry brush each layer on. It looks good, but not as great as I was hoping. So, I will lightly sand the top and apply another coat; hopefully that will give me a smooth shiny surface I want. I have not even started on the drawers, feet or the mirror. Let me ask, what the fuck was I thinking? I really need to give MtnMan his garage back. Now, with that said, he has not said a word about it, and has no problem parking outside, but it is something that I should not have taken on. I mean, I have never fucking refurbished furniture before, and I am still questioning those who enjoy such tasks. lol.

Another “project” that has the other half of the garage taken up is drying out some family photos that I was able to salvage from Texas. Oy. My parents wedding album was completely soaked, but thankfully it was in a beautiful album that protected the pictures. However, I had to pull them out and lay them about to get the dampness out of them. Along with that, I have family obits, baby pictures and a box of random pictures going back generations… most were damp. I also have 100 year old newspaper articles from WWI and WWII and a few other notable events. Those were saved. All of which was in a gorgeous cedar chest, which protected everything enclosed for 50+ years… until the items were pulled out and left in the rain. But, that is neither here, nor there. It is what it is, and other than proving that I did the smart thing by walking away from such negative hate, I have what is most important.  My happiness and a future that is mine. So, there is that. lol. 

I almost forgot to mention, I have Mom’s wedding gown that she made. It is beautiful and showing the age of time, but other than a few stains, I am going to try to get it professionally cleaned, if I can find someone that is willing to take the chance. I say that because it is 63 years old and it was handmade. It is in very delicate condition. 

Now it is your turn. Tell me what has been going on in your world… 

Memorial Day: What Today Means To Me

This is a thread that I have reposted several times now, but it is worth another copy/paste. This day holds a lot of meaning that does not change over the course of the year and there is no need to write anything new, but, with that said I thought I would share the history of Memorial Day with you. 

What today means to me:

Memorial Day isn’t the day that starts summer, nor is it the day that gives me an excuse to head to the lake to drink like a fool. Memorial Day is the one day that we, as a country, actually stop to think about our freedom. It’s the one day that, as a whole, we appreciate those who gave their lives and sacrificed their futures so that we could have one. Many never made it home while others did, but let us not forget what they ultimately gave. Their lives. I’m thankful for all soldiers, nurses, families and lives from past and present wars and those who pick up the pieces on the homefront while their soldier is away fighting for all of us. So, thank you for my freedom and the right to live my life as I do.

memorial-day

A little bit of history:

It began as Decoration Day following the Civil War in 1868, when Union veterans declared it as a time for the nation to remember the dead by placing flowers on graves. For many years the Union and Confederate soldiers remembered their fallen on different days. They soon merged, and Memorial Day became a tradition to honor all Americans who died while in military service.

Volunteers place flags at each grave site in national cemeteries, but many other towns have also taken on the task of acknowledging their fallen in the same tradition. This day has become a popular day to hold reunions, reuniting families and honoring their loved ones. People come together on this designated day to place flowers and renew relationships with family and friends. They will host a potluck meal that is believed to date back before the Civil War which may be the origin of Memorial Day.

An interesting tidbit is that Warrenton, Virginia claims to have the first grave to be decorated, on June 3, 1861, implying the birth of Memorial Day. However, the next several years it was the women who decorated Confederate graves, and Gettysburg, Pennsylvania that hosted a dedication ceremony. The following year it was the women in Baolsburg, PA and now they lay claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day. (Now, not to take away from the serious honor this day holds, I’m confused as to how they can claim that when they were three years late to the party. One more note that I feel needs to be added: Of course it was the women.)

Now, what I find intriguing is that President Johnson signed a presidential proclamation in 1966 naming Waterloo, New York as the birthplace. It has something to do with a House Concurrent Resolution that officially recognized Waterloo for starting the patriotic tradition. (Maybe, as the President, he knew more than the rest of us?) Other cities that lay claim to beginning such a tradition are Boalsburg, PA, Carbondale, IL (um, what?), Columbus, GA and Columbus, MS. Even more intriguing is that a recent study investigating the Waterloo claim, along with all others, conludes that nearly all of them are doubtful. (Wait, you mean to tell me that someone who was close to Pres. Johnson told him Waterloo should be recognized as the birthplace, and he took them at their word? Yeah. There’s no reason to believe that people in high places are bought and paid for by favors and monetary funds.)

Memorial Day was observed on May 30th because it wasn’t an anniversary for any particular battles. It was first recognized by the southern states but quickly adopted by their northern neighbors. It didn’t become a common “holiday” until after WWII and it wasn’t until 1968 that it was moved to the last Monday; giving people a three day weekend.

The VFW stated in a 2002 Memorial Day Address:

“Changing the date merely to create three-day weekends has undermined the very meaning of the day. No doubt, this has contributed a lot to the general public’s nonchalant observance of Memorial Day.” 

According to Wikipedia (written and edited by anyone, stupid and smart alike):

“Ironton, OH lays claim to the nation’s oldest continuously running Memorial Day parade. Its first parade was held May 5, 1868, and the town has held it every year since; however, the Memorial Day parade in Doylestown, PA, predates Ironton’s by one year.” 

(I think Ironton has some explaining to do! How can it be the oldest running parade if Doylestown started a year earlier? My initial thought was that the key words were “oldest continuously running” but Doylestown host an annual parade.)

I leave you with a poem written during WWI by a Canadian poet, doctor and soldier Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses, row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.

We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.

Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.

 

 

What Memorial Day Means To Me:

Memorial-Day

Memorial Day isn’t the day that starts summer, nor is it the day that gives me an excuse to head to the lake to drink like a fool. Memorial Day is the one day that we, as a country, actually stop to think about our freedom. It’s the one day that, as a whole, we appreciate those who gave their lives and sacrificed their futures so that we could have one. Many never made it home while others did, but let us not forget what they ultimately gave. Their lives. I’m thankful for all soldiers, nurses, families and lives from past and present wars and those who pick up the pieces on the homefront while their soldier is away fighting for all of us. So, thank you for my freedom and the right to live my life as I do.

 

The Barbed Wire Ways..

barbed.wire.1

I’m always fascinated by tidbits of history and how things came about. We’re currently watching an Amazon series about America. It takes you back in time to show you how life was during a certain period, why a certain event caused an invention that was meant to be a quick solution, and how that invention transformed America.

During the great cattle drive from Texas to Nebraska, the families that migrated to the mid west to farm the land was being trampled by the herds moving through their crops. The cowboy’s had one concern, and it wasn’t the farms being destroyed by their wild herds. There seemed to be no stopping them, and the farmers were losing a lot of hard work and money, all at the expense of the Cowboy’s…. until one farmer made barbed wire and fenced his entire property, keeping the herds off of his crops. That was his solution to his problem, which turned into a mass produced invention. Within years he made enough barbed wire fencing to go around the world not once, but twice! The history behind that invention just fascinates me!

 

 

Juneteenth

President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation in 1862, to become effective on January 1st, of the following year. He declared all slaves would be free, and no longer owned by another person. However, it had very little effect in the Confederate States, including Texas. General Gordon Granger and 2,000 troops arrived on the island of Galveston, TX on June 18th, 1865 to take custody of the state, and to emancipate all slaves.

On June 19th he stood on the balcony of Ashton Villa and read this:

The people of Texas are informed that, in accordance with a proclamation from the Executive of the United States, all slaves are free. This involves an absolute equality of personal rights and rights of property between former masters and slaves, and the connection heretofore existing between them becomes that between employer and hired labor. The freed men are advised to remain quietly at their present homes and work for wages. They are informed that they will not be allowed to collect at military posts and that they will not be supported in idleness either there or elsewhere.

African Americans rejoiced in the streets of Galveston that day, and Juneteenth celebrations began the next year. Across Texas the freed people came together and purchased large areas just for June 19th festivities. The Emancipation Park in Austin is one of them. However, when the economy declined many black families had to leave the farms and look for work in cities and their new employers weren’t willing to give them time off for Juneteenth. It wasn’t until recent years that it has become a well known celebration and acknowledged across the states. As recent as the 1980’s and into the 1990’s it has had an increase in interest. In fact, organizations like the National Juneteenth Observance Foundation are working towards making Juneteenth a national day of observance.

So, today is definitely a day that we all should recognize as a huge part of our history. One that should be embraced and celebrated!